Shomeya

Two web artists. One amazing company.

Articles tagged: Drupal Planet

Styling Bootstrap 3 Buttons in Drupal 7: Part 1

from Sarah Prasuhn on June 2, 2015 03:20pm

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One of the greatest differences between Bootstrap 2 and Bootstrap 3 is the out of the box look and feel. Bootstrap 2 had a lot more pre-built colors and states, whereas Bootstrap 3 is a little more barebones.

So we're going to cover adding the class to integrate the basic default buttons, and then in Part 2 cover how to implement some more pre-built styles the colors, and sizing etc.

Like most frameworks you just add the class of course...but where?

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Running Your Agency/Tech Company like a Factory is Destroying Humanity: Part 2

from Sarah Prasuhn on May 11, 2015 12:45pm

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In case you missed it Part 1

Very carefully I cut the letters out of the magazines that are strewn across my table. My fingers covered in glue, I lay them out one at a time on a piece of heavy duty paper, a message for the CEO of my friend's company. A message to save humanity:

"Your company is following the startup lemmings off the cliff, do you care?"

-- Anonymous

Every year your agency or startup is throwing away thousands of dollars, because you follow some very bad habits that reward mediocrity and egos. I know because as a CEO of even a tiny company, I've watched you bleed and wanted to hand you the bandage.

At Shomeya I am the CEO and the Project manager, when I fuck up and put my programmer in a bad position I see how it effects his work AND his home life. I feel every late night, and regret every poor choice when I said yes to the client, because I deal with the results.

So I learned to adjust Shomeya to make better choices. And the good news is these choices can scale because they are based on something we all deal with no matter what the size of our payroll; human brains.

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Running Your Agency/Tech Company like a Factory is Destroying Humanity: Part 1

from Sarah Prasuhn on April 22, 2015 03:10pm

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I'm running endlessly through the woods, as far away from Silicon Forest/Valley as I can. Facebook has collapsed, so has Google, so has everything. A post-social media, free internet, apocalyptic world has ensued and all of the developers have gone into the woods to escape the aftermath clutching their now worthless laptops. In my dream all the CEOs of the software companies are in a room patting themselves on the back for giving it a good go, while the world falls apart in the aftermath of their self-focused existence.

This may have just been a crazy post White God viewing dream I had, but it touches on something real. Something that as a consultant for multiple companies I see all the the time.

And it's killing me. It's killing your company, and you're too busy getting beers with your funders to notice. Meanwhile your developers, project managers, and everyone else that is the core of your business is slowly burning out until they rage quit and go somewhere else to start it all over again.

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Web-Consulting's Dirty Little Secret

from Sarah Prasuhn on April 9, 2015 01:05pm

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It's the day after a launch and your client calls you in a sheer panic. Traffic is not as high as they'd like! Why aren't their new social media features paying off? Don't you know what you're doing? And to top it all off the site is slow! You need to fix this now.

As you listen to your client yell, you drift back in time to that first meeting where you both are posturing and laying down the ground rules for each other. Business as usual planning out the new details with excitement and anticipation.

And then the moment comes back to you. The moment when you said nonchalantly, "We can do that feature, but it may cause the site to slow down. Why is this feature so important?" And the client, also nonchalantly said, "We just need it, our competitors all have it." And you both went back to going over the other features on the list, not realizing that you had just wasted thousands of your client's dollars and hours of your life on something that most users don't give a flying flip about bringing almost zero value to the world, all because everybody's doing it. This is how the business just works, and hardly anyone ever questions it.

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Knowing when to use content types and when to use custom entities

from Michael Prasuhn on April 3, 2015 07:15am

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Ever catch yourself staring at your editor? Then switching over and staring at the content types overview of your new Drupal site? Then back to the client requirements? And then doing it all over again and again while you face a decision? Drupal content types and fields vs. custom entities. That's the tough decision. The choices you make here will affect almost part of site building to come, but it's so hard to know which to choose.

On one hand, Drupal fields are getting better, faster and more flexible all the time with better integration with contributed modules like views. But at the same time the new entity API with Drupal 7 is more flexible than ever, allowing you to add fields to even your own custom entities. So which route should you go? How can you make a decision like this without second guessing yourself all the time?

Why getting it right is important

While lots of projects can go either way the downsides can make the difference between a successful web project and a maintenance or performance nightmare. Using content types and fields with a complex data model that requires lots of complex queries can hurt performance, but using custom entities when you don't need them can add a maintenance burden when it comes time to upgrade your site or make changes. So how do you make that decision?

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A cheat sheet for hook_entity_api()

from Michael Prasuhn on March 26, 2015 11:10am

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The worst time to read software documentation is when you're trying to fix something that is broken and you have no idea why. I'd say it's like shopping when you're hungry, but it's actually the opposite. When stuff breaks for no apparent reason and you're on edge it's easy to notice every little issue with the docs, and you instantly form a very strong opinion on documentation.

The good news is that as a Drupal developer, you have tons of awesome documentation just a click away on api.drupal.org or drupal.org/documentation/develop and contributed module documentation is better than ever. Even though almost everything you could ever want to know about Drupal internals is available on api.drupal.org (even the source code!) sometimes you need to combine that with contributed docs, or dig in a little deeper.

That's exactly what I had to do while working on the first few chapters of Model Your Data with Drupal. Hooks like hook_entity_info() are well documented on api.drupal.org, but the Entity API module adds it's own options to the mix. Entity API has great docs on it's options as well, but there isn't a lot out there that thoroughly documents them together, or the interaction of their options.

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All about that trace, 'bout that trace

from Michael Prasuhn on March 19, 2015 09:25am

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No one likes debugging code when it breaks and you can't figure out why it's broken. That piece of code might have been hard enough to write in the first place, or maybe it's a snippet that "should work" from a coworker, or maybe the documentation is missing, or maybe.... But what if you've checked, double and triple checked, and it's still not your code, it's something else in the system – code you're calling out to, or something that is calling your code – what do you do then?

Enter the backtrace, (also known as stack trace, or just trace). A powerful weapon in any software developers toolkit, it is more and more useful as the software you develop grows in complexity (Drupal 8 anyone?)

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When Success Starts to Feel like Failure

from Sarah Prasuhn on March 2, 2015 01:55pm

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Last week was awesome, sort of. I hit all the numbers on my guide launch I was hoping for, and then promptly got the stomach flu. After two years (lots of running in circles) of working through this process of launching I did it!

Now it could have just been being sick, but I ended the launch wanting something more. And the reality is this isn't the first time I've been down after a success.

Does that ever happen to you? You get so excited about something and launch it? Then the next day you wonder if you could have done better, or you aren't sure where to go next. It's happened with our clients, we work so hard, we push the code, we launch on time, and then the question of "Now what?" lingers.

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